Blaydon War Memorial - the Names of the Fallen

Ha to He


Private William HALL 1884 – 1918                

William Hall was the son of Mrs. B.Hall of Polmaise Street,Blaydon and the husband of Annie Hall of 58 Trewhitt Road,Heaton, Newcastle upon Tyne. William served with the Northumberland Fusiliers 1/5th Battalion service No: 47372. He was killed in action on 22 March 1918 and named on the Pozieres Memorial, panel 16-18. The POZIERES MEMORIAL relates to the period of crisis in March and April 1918 when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory, which began on 8 August 1918.The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the United Kingdom and 300 of the South African Forces who have no known grave and who died on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918. The Corps and Regiments most largely represented are The Rifle Brigade with over 600 names, The Durham Light Infantry with approximately 600 names, the Machine Gun Corps with over 500, The Manchester Regiment with approximately 500 and The Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery with over 400 names.

Awarded the British
War and Victory Medals, locally William is remembered on the Blaydon War
Memorial.

 

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William HALL

 

Named on the Blaydon War Memorial.
We regret we have no other information available.

 

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Private Duncan HALLIDAY 1897 – 1915

Duncan Hallidaywas the son of James and Margaret ( Barber) Halliday.In 1901 the family were
living at 25 Victoria Street, Blaydon where Duncan’s father worked as abricklayer’s labourer.Duncan enlistedat Blaydon and served with the Northumberland Fusiliers, 25thTyneside Irish Battalion, service No: 35551. Posted abroad he was killed in action,posted missing presumed dead on 12 April 1918. Awarded the British War andVictory medals, Duncan is named on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Panel 2.

The PloegsteertMemorial commemorates more than 11,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom andSouth African forces who died in this sector during the First World War andhave no known grave. The memorial serves the area from the lineCaestre-Dranoutre-Warneton to the north, to Haverskerque-Estaires-Fournes tothe south, including the towns of Hazebrouck, Merville, Bailleul and Armentieres, the Forest of Nieppe, and Ploegsteert Wood. The original intention had been to erect the memorial in Lille. Most of those commemorated by the memorial did not die in major offensives,such as those which took place around Ypres to the north, or Loos to the south.
Most were killed in the course of the day-to-day trench warfare which characterised this part of the line, or in small scale set engagements, usually carried out in support of the major attacks taking place elsewhere. It does not include the names of officers and men of Canadian or Indian regiments (they are found on the Memorials at Vimy and Neuve-Chapelle) and those lost at the Battle
of Aubers Ridge, 9 May 1915, who were involved in the Southern Pincer (the 1st, 2nd, Meerut and 47th Divisions - they are commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial).


Locally, Duncan is remembered on the Blaydon War
Memorial and the plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon.

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Able Seaman Charles Clark HANDS 1898 – 1916
 

Charles ClarkHands was born in Blaydon one of five surviving children. In 1911 he was living at 24 George Street, Blaydon with his father George, a quarry worker, mother Alice Maria and siblings including older brother Thomas. Charles enlisted into the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Service No: Tyneside Z/9150 and served on HMS Invincible. HMS Invincible was an Invincible Class Battlecruiser
built at Elswick, and launched in March 1909, at a cost of £1,767,515. Invincible was fitted with experimental electrically powered gun turrets, but after disappointing trials they were found to be slower then hydraulic turrets, so in 1914 the turrets were re-fitted with conventional hydraulic power. Charles was killed in action on 31 May 1916 age 18 years at the Battle of Jutland when HMS Invincible sank with the loss of 1,026 of her crew; only 5 men survived. After the First World War, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided.

An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain - Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth - should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping. The memorials were designed by Sir Robert Lorimer, who had already carried out a considerable amount of work for the Commission, with sculpture by Henry Poole. The Chatham Naval Memorial was unveiled by the Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) on 26 April 1924.After the Second World War it was decided that the naval memorials should be extended to provide space for commemorating the naval dead without graves of that war, but since the three sites were dissimilar, a different architectural treatment was required for each. The architect for the Second World War extension at Chatham was Sir Edward Maufe (who also designed the Air Forces memorial at Runnymede) and the additional sculpture was by Charles Wheeler and William McMillan. The Extension was unveiled by the Duke of Edinburgh on 15 October 1952. Chatham Naval Memorial commemorates 8,517 sailors of the First World War and
10,098 of the Second World War.

Locally
Charles is remembered on the Blaydon War Memorial at on the plaque at St.
Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon.

Tragically
Charles’ older brother Thomas was killed only a month later on 1 July 1916. See
Blaydon 111.
 

SL / 052013       HANDS/BLAYDON110

                                                                    Private Thomas HANDS 1896 – 1916          

Thomas Hands, one of five surviving children was the son of George and Alice Maria Hands. In the 1911 census he was living with his family including younger brother Charles at 24 George Street, Blaydon. Later the family lived at 22 George Street,Blaydon. Thomas worked as a colliery driver below ground while his father worked as a quarry stone sawyer. Thomas attested to the Northumberland Fusiliers 27th Tyneside Irish battalion, service No: 27/1006. Posted to France, Thomas was killed in action on 1 July 1916 age 20years. On that day the Great Franco-British offensive begins on 25-mile front north and south of Somme.  British capture Montauban and Mametz; break through towards Bapaume.  French attack towards Peronne; reach outskirts of Hardecourt and Curlu; take Dompierre,
Becquincourt, Bussus, and Fay.  5,000 prisoners taken.Thomas is named on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, Pier and Face 10B, 11B and 12B.

On 1 July 1916, supported by a French attack to the south, thirteen divisions of Commonwealth forces launched an offensive on a line from north of Gommecourt to Maricourt. Despite a preliminary bombardment lasting seven days, the German defences were
barely touched and the attack met unexpectedly fierce resistance. Losses were catastrophic and with only minimal advances on the southern flank, the initial attack was a failure. In the following weeks, huge resources of manpower and equipment were deployed in an attempt to exploit the modest successes of the first day. However, the German Army resisted tenaciously and repeated attacks
and counter attacks meant a major battle for every village, copse and farmhouse gained. At the end of September, Thiepval was finally captured. The village had been an original objective of 1 July. Attacks north and east continued throughout October and into November in increasingly difficult weather conditions. The Battle of the Somme finally ended on 18 November with the onset of winter.

In the spring of 1917, the German forces fell back to their newly prepared defences, the Hindenburg Line, and there were no further significant engagements in the Somme sector until the Germans mounted their major offensive in March 1918. The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial also serves as an Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the memorial.

Awarded the
British War and Victory Medals, Thomas is remembered locally on the Blaydon War

Memorial and the plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon. 

Tragically Thomas’ younger brother Charles had been killed only a month earlier on 31 May 1916.

See Hands/Blaydon 110  

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Private Charles Hope HANDYSIDE  1898-1918

Charles Hope Handyside was the son of Joseph and Jane Handyside. The family lived at 2 Cowen’s Buildings, Blaydon and included three other siblings Ann,Thomas and Joseph. Charle’s father was a storeman at the colliery. Charles enlisted in the Wests Yorkshire Regiment, Prince of Wales Own 10th Battalion service No. 50488. He was killed in action on 18 September 1918 aged 21 years. He is remembered on the Vis en Artois Memorial, Pas de Calais, France :Panel 4. This Memorial bears the names of over 9,000 men who fell in the period from 8 August 1918 to the date of the Armistice in the Advance to Victory in Picardy and Artois,between the Somme and Loos, and who have no known grave. They belonged to the forces of Great Britain and Ireland and South Africa; the Canadian, Australian and New Zealand forces being commemorated on other memorials to the missing.

Locally, Charles is remembered on the Blaydon War Memorial.

Awarded the British War and Victory Medals

 
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Private George HARRISON 1885-1916
                 
George was born at Crook, Co. Durham the son of John G. and Alice Harrison. By 1911 he was married to Dorothy , working as a coal miner and living at 13 Prospect Place, Winlaton. George attested at High Spen and served with the Durham Light Infantry 1/9th
Battalion service No; 4125. Posted to France George died of wounds on 29 September 1916 age 31 years. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery , plot XI.C.2A.

During the First World War, the area around Etaples was the scene of immense concentrations of Commonwealth reinforcement camps and hospitals. It was remote from attack,except from aircraft, and accessible by railway from both the northern or the southern battlefields. In 1917, 100,000 troops were camped among the sand dunes and the hospitals, which included eleven general, one stationary, four Red Cross hospitals and a convalescent depot, could deal with 22,000 wounded or sick. In September 1919, ten months after the Armistice, three hospitals and the Q.M.A.A.C. convalescent depot remained.The cemetery contains 10,771 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, the earliest dating from May 1915.35 of which are unidentified.

Awarded the British War and Victory Medals, locally George is remembered
on the Blaydon War Memorial and the Plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon.

 

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Able Seaman Richard HARRISON 1888-1917 

Richard was born at Sunniside the son of Martha Birbeck Harrison. In 1911 he was working as a coal miner and living as a boarder at 3 Burn Road, Winlaton. He married Hannah and later addresses are Quality Row, Swalwell and 34 Cuthbert Street,Blaydon.Richard attested to the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Howe Battalion Royal Naval Division,Tyneside Z/2157 on 3 December 1914. He was
mobilised on 28 June 1915 and joined Howe Battalion. Returned home for medical treatment in November 1916 he was remobilised on 30 July 1917 and re-joined Howe battalion on 25 August 1917.Posted assumed killed in action on 26 October 1917, age 29
years, Richard is named on the Tynecot Memorial to the Missing, Panel 2-3 and 162-162A.

The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Broadly speaking, the Salient stretched from Langemarck in the north to the northern edge in Ploegsteert Wood in the south, but it varied in area and shape throughout the war. The Salient was formed during the First Battle of Ypres in October and November 1914, when
a small British Expeditionary Force succeeded in securing the town before the onset of winter, pushing the German forces back to the Passchendaele Ridge. The Second Battle of Ypres began in April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. In 1917,when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive was mounted by Commonwealth forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south.The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November  with the capture of Passchendaele
The battles of the Ypres Salient claimed many lives on both sides and it quickly became clear that the commemoration of members of the Commonwealth forces with no known grave would have to be divided between several different sites. The memorial forms the north-eastern boundary of Tyne Cot Cemetery, which was established around a captured German blockhouse or pill-box used as an advanced
dressing station. The original battlefield cemetery of 343 graves was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when remains were brought in from the battlefields of Passchendaele and Langemarck, and from a few small burial grounds. It is now the largest Commonwealth war cemetery in the world in terms of burials. At the suggestion of King George V, who visited the cemetery in 1922, the Cross of
Sacrifice was placed on the original large pill-box. There are three other pill-boxes in the cemetery. There are now 11,956 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in Tyne Cot Cemetery.

Awarded the Star, Victory and British War Medals, locally Richard is
remembered on the Blaydon War Memorial and on the Plaque at St. Cuthbert’s
Church, Blaydon.
 

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Private John William HARWOOD  1898 – 1918

 John W. Harwood was the son of John, a general labourer at the sanitary pipe works & Mary Harwood and one of five children. In the 1911 census John was still at school giving his age as 13 and the family were living at 22 Thomas Terrace, Blaydon. He is recorded as
serving with the Manchester Regiment 1/6th Battalion service No:53320. Posted to France he was killed in action on 27 September 1918. He is recorded as having a wife Eliza Foster ( formerly Harwood) of 2 Cross Terrace, Scotswood and his age at death is recorded as 23 years. He was awarded the British War & Victory Medals. He is buried at Ribecourt Road Cemetery,Pas de Calais, France grave ref: III.E.5 and remembered locally at Blaydon War Memorial and at St. Cuthbert’s Church,Blaydon.

RIBECOURT ROAD CEMETERY, PAS DE CALAIS, FRANCE
Ribecourt was taken on the 20th November 1917 by the 6th Division, but at the conclusion of the Battle of Cambrai it remained practically on the British front line; it was lost in March 1918 and recaptured by the 3rd and 42nd (East Lancashire) Divisions
on the following 27th September. Trescault remained in British hands until March 1918 and was retaken by the 37th Division on the following 12th September. In Ribecourt Road Cemetery, Rows B, C and D in Plot I contain graves of November 1917 to February 1918, chiefly of the 51st (Highland) and 59th (North Midland) Divisions; but the remainder of the cemetery was made in October 1918,
almost entirely by the 42nd Division (who called it the Divisional Cemetery, Trescault).There are now over 250, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, a small number are unidentified.The Cemetery covers an area of 1,015 square metres and is enclosed by a low rubble wall. 274 metres to the West is a Battle Memorial erected by the 42nd Division.


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Private William Routledge HAWDON 1884 – 1916

William Hawdon was born at Lamesley, Co. Durham the son of William George Hawdon and Mary Ann Routledge. One of ten surviving children ,in 1911 he was living with his family at 14, then 12 Edward Street, Blaydon. Both he and his father worked as labourers at the coke works.William attested to the Northumberland Fusiliers ‘C’ Coy. 9th Battalion, service No: 6901. Posted to France he is
reported as having died of wounds on 7 July 1916 age 32 years. On that day the British again advance; portion of Leipzig Redoubt carried on Thiepval Plateau.  Fighting at Ovillers and east of La Boiselle.  Contalmaison won but not held.His name is recorded on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, Pier and face 10B,11B and 12B.

On 1 July 1916, supported by a French attack to the south, thirteen divisions of Commonwealth forces launched an offensive on a line from north of Gommecourt to Maricourt. Despite a preliminary bombardment lasting seven days, the German defences were barely touched and the attack met unexpectedly fierce resistance. Losses were catastrophic and with only minimal advances on the southern flank, the initial attack was a failure. In the following weeks, huge resources of manpower and equipment were deployed in an attempt to exploit the modest successes of the first day. However, the German Army resisted tenaciously and repeated attacks and counter attacks meant a major battle for every village, copse and farmhouse gained. At the end of September, Thiepval was finally captured. The village had been an original objective of 1 July. Attacks north and east continued throughout October and into November in increasingly
difficult weather conditions. The Battle of the Somme finally ended on 18 November with the onset of winter. In the spring of 1917, the German forces fell back to their newly prepared defences, the Hindenburg Line, and there were no further significant engagements in the Somme sector until the Germans mounted their major offensive in March 1918. The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November
1916. The memorial also serves as an Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the memorial.

Locally William is remembered on the Blaydon War Memorial and the plaque at 

St.Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon.

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James HAYES

Named on the Blaydon war memorial.

We regret we have no other information available.

 SL/122013                                                                                              HAYES/BLAYDON117


Henry HAYWOOD

 

Henry Haywood is named on the 1911 census as living at 6 Railway Street, Blaydon as a boarder, age 25 years. He was born at Walker,
Newcastle upon Tyne is single and worked as a sanitary clay pipe moulder.

Remembered on the Blaydon War Memorial.

We regret we have no other information available.

 

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Private Thomas Henry HAYWOOD  d1916

 

            Thomas, born in Gateshead, worked as a labourer and lived at 65 Tyne Street, Blaydon. He was the brother of Mary
Ann Pearson of 14 Evelyn Terrace, Blaydon. Thomas attested to the Northumberland Fusiliers 13th Battallion service No: 9200. Posted to France he was killed in action on 28 April 1916 and is buried at Dartmoor Cemetery Becordel-Becourt plot: I.D.24.Dartmoor Cemetery was begun (as Becordel-Becourt Military Cemetery) in August 1915 and was used by the battalions holding that part of the line; its name was changed in May 1916 at the request of the 8th and 9th Battalions of the Devonshire Regiment. Dartmoor Cemetery contains 768 Commonwealth burials of the First World war.


Awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory Medals,

locally Thomas is remembered on the

Blaydon War Memorial and the Plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon.

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John P. HEANAGHAN

 John, born in 1877 is named on the 1911 census living with his family at 27 Robinson Street, Blaydon. He was the son of Martin and Mary Ann Heanaghan and one of six children. His father Martin who worked as a coal miner hewer had been born in Ireland,
while John born at St. Helen’s, Lancashire worked as a labourer. 

John is remembered on the Blaydon War Memorial.

We regret we have no other information available.


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Private William Robson HEPPELL  1880 – 1918

William Robson Heppell was the son of John and Mary Jane Heppell. He was born at Elswick,Newcastle upon Tyne where his father was working as a coal miner. William married Carrie Gray in 1903 and by 1911 the family were living at 11 James Street, Blaydon with their children. William worked as a coal miner,hewer and they had five children together – Edward,Frank,George,William and Carrie.William served with the 20th battalion Northumberland Fusiliers service No: 177 and was later transferred to the Cheshire regiment 9th Battalion service No: 52329. He was killed in action on 24 March 1918 age 38 years. On that day the Germans held in desperate fighting round Bapaume, cross Somme between Peronne and Ham, and take Nesle and Peronne, and further south capture Guiscard and Chauny.  They now claim 30,000 prisoners and 600 guns.British aeroplanes raid Mannheim by day and Cologne by night.  William was
buried at the Delsaux Farm Cemetery, Beugny grave ref: III.B.6 ( buried near this spot).Delsaux lFarm was a point on the German defensive system known as the Beugny-Ytres line, which was reached by Commonwealth troops on 18 March 1917, and passed on the following day. The farm was lost on 23 March 1918 after the gallant defence of Beugny by the 9th Welsh Regiment and their withdrawal,
but it was retaken by the 5th Division on 2 September 1918, and on the next day the same division occupied Beugny village.

After their advance in March 1918, the Germans made a cemetery (Beugny Military Cemetery No.18) at the cross-roads, and in it buried 103 Commonwealth and 82 German dead. The site was extended in October - November 1918 by the 29th and 46th Casualty Clearing Stations, which came to Delsaux Farm and made the present cemetery. A little later, the German graves of March 1918 were removed
and the 103 Commonwealth dead reburied in Plot I, Row J, Plot II, Row A, and Plot III, Rows B, C and D. The rest of the cemetery was made when graves were later brought in from the battlefield.Delsaux Farm Cemetery contains 495 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 61 of the burials are unidentified and 32 others, identified as a whole but not individually, are marked with headstones inscribed "Buried near this spot”.

Awarded the

British War and Victory Medals, locally James is remembered on the

 Blaydon War Memorial and on the plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon

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Private John Cousins HEWITT 1891 – 1916

 John Cousins Hewitt known as Jack was born at Hamsterly Colliery, Co. Durham. He was one of seven children and in 1901 was living with his family – father Samuel, mother Sarah Ann ( Cousins ) Hewitt, including older brother William, at 7 Garden Street, Blaydon. He was working as a coke yard labourer while his brother worked as a miner at Addison Colliery. Jack enlisted at Newcastle upon Tyne on 3 September 1914 and served with the Durham Light Infantry, service No: 13306.He was killed in action on 11 February 1916 and is buried at Ferme-Olivier Cemetery, grave ref:Plot 2, Row G, Grave 2. Ferme-Olivier Cemetery is located 7 kilometres north west of Ieper The cemetery was used continuously between 9 June 1915 and 5 August 1917, with the 62nd, 16th, 9th, 11th, 129th and 130th Field Ambulances successively having dressing stations close by. Throughout this period, the village was just within range of the

German artillery and a collective grave in Plot 2, Row E, contains the remains of 37 men of the 3rd Bn Monmouthshire Regiment killed on parade on 29 December 1915 by a single shell fired from a naval gun in Houthulst Forest. The graves in Plot 3 run in order of date of death and show the successive occupations of Elverdinghe Chateau by the 38th (Welsh) Division, the Guards Division and units
of the Royal Artillery. The cemetery contains 408 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 6 of which are unidentified, and three German war graves.

 Sadly Jack’s older brother William was killed nine months later on 16 November 1916. See
Hewitt/Blaydon 123.

 
Awarded the 14/15 star, British War and Victory Medals,

 locally Jack is remembered on the Blaydon War Memorial and on the plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon.

 
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Private William HEWITT 1886 – 1916



 William Hewitt, born at Easington Lane, Co. Durham was the son of Samuel and Sarah Ann ( Cousins) Hewitt and one of seven children. In 1911 the family were living at 7 Garden Street, Blaydon where William worked as a miner at Addison Colliery and his younger brother Jack worked as a coke yard labourer.William enlisted at Newcastle upon Tyne and served with the Hussars of the Line, service No: 22355 and the 2d Battalion, Suffolk regiment, service No: 19035. Posted to France he was killed in action on 16 November 1916. On that day there were heavy French and German air fights near Amiens.The British line extended east from Beaucourt, retreat from part of ground east of Butte de Warlencourt.French regain ground east of Pressoir.

Awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory medals in his army will William left all his personal possessions to his mother and he was
buried at Bertrancourt Military Cemetery, France grave ref: Plot 1, Row K, Grave 8. His obituary appeared in the Blaydon Courier on 2 December 1916, page 5.

Pertrancourt is a village in the Department of the Somme The cemetery was used by field ambulances in 1916 and 1917 and again by corps and divisional burial parties in the critical months of June, July and August 1918, when German advances brought the front line to within 8 kilometres of Bertrancourt. There are 416 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery.  

Sadly, William’s brother John C. ( Jack) Hewitt was  also killed in action nine months earlier on 11 February 1916. See Hewitt/Blaydon 122.

Locally William is remembered on the Blaydon war memorial,
the plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon and he was also named on the
Addison Colliery war memorial.

 

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