Winlaton War Memorial - the Names of the Fallen

G to L

 

GARDNER , Private Michael 1879 – 1916

           

 Michael Gardner, one of nine children, was the son of James and Mary Gardner. He married Mary Emma McDermott in 1903 and together they had six children. They lived at 5 Northumberland Sq., Golden Hill, Winlaton and Michael worked as a miner hewer.

Michael attested to the Northumberland Fusiliers 27th Battalion Tyneside Irish, service No: 27/260. Posted to France he was killed in action on 3 September 1916 age 36 years. He is named on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, Pier and Face 10B, 11B and 12B. 

Awarded the British War and Victory medals,

locally Michael is remembered on the War Memorial Cross at

St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton.

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GASCOIGNE , Corporal John James  1894 – 1917 

John James Gascoigne was a cartman and the son of John, a bricklayer at the brickworks, and Margareta Gascoigne, one of 7 children. In 1911 the family were living at 53 James Street, Blaydon although by the time that John died they were living at 55 North Street, Winlaton. John attested to the Durham Light Infantry 2nd Battalion service No: 22296 on 27 November 1914.

He was posted to France where he served 28 June 1915 – 14 November 1915 and again from 10 February 1916 until 22 April 1917. We know from surviving service records that he was 5’ 7” tall with a fair complexion, light brown hair, hazel eyes and weighed 135 lbs. He was promoted to Corporal on 4 April 1917 and killed in action on 22 April 1917 age 24 years. After death his personal possessions, returned to his family were recorded as: letters, photos, religious book, bomber badge (cloth), 4 buttons and a small purse. He is buried at Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, Pas de Calais, France grave ref: II.0.7 

He was awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

and locally remembered on the Winlaton Cross at St. Paul’s Church.

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GAUL , Lance Corporal William J. 1888 -1918

William James Gaul was born in Dunston the son of James & Elizabeth Gaul. His father worked as a fireman at the gas yard and in 1891 they were living at Teams Cottages, Dunston Road. William married in 1910 and in 1911 he was living with his wife Emma age 20 at 23 Twizell Avenue, Blaydon. They were living as boarders at the home of coal miner Alfred Wilson, his wife, four children and another boarder, altogether nine people living in four rooms. William was working as a sulphate amonia assistant at the chemical works.

He enlisted to the Northumberland Fusilers 14th Battalion service No: 6305. Posted abroad he died in Germany in 1918 age 30 years and he is buried at Hamburg Cemetery grave ref: III.B.9.  

Awarded the 14/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Locally William is remembered on the Winlaton Cross War Memorial

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GILHESPY , Private John Robson  1881-1918 

        John Robson Gilhespy was a house painter. He married Elizabeth in 1905 and at the time of the 1911 census they were living at 120 John Street, Blaydon with their two young children Phyllis and John. His familylater moved to 6 Edith Avenue, Blaydon.

John joined the Durham Light Infantry 37302 and was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps service No. 67382. He died of wounds age 38 on 21 October 1918 and is buried at Delsaux Farm Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

 

John was awarded the British War and Victory medals

and locally is remembered on the Winlaton War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton. 

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GILL , Private William 1877-1916

 

             William Gill was born at Stargate near Blaydon in 1877. By 1911 he was married to Margaret, working as a coal miner and living at 57 North Street, Winlaton with Margaret and his two sons John and Robert.

He attested at Newcastle upon Tyne and served with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 11th Battalion, service No: 17458. Posted to france he was killed in action on 1 July 1916 age 39 years and is buried at Mill Road Cemetery, Thiepval grave ref: XIX.G.3.  Battles : Battles of the Somme, Battle of Albert 1-13 July 1916.

 

Awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory medals,

locally William is remembered on the Winlaton War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton.



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GRAHAM , Private Daniel  1885 – 1916 

Daniel Graham was the son of John & Mary Graham and was born at Emma vill, Ryton. In 1901 he was living with his parents and siblings at 35 Delaval Road, Benwell. He had married Sarah Smith on 28 March 1910 and by 1911 he was working as a coal miner and living with his wife and stepdaughter at 29 Newburn Bridge End, Newburn. They went on to have two more children Mary and John. He enlisted at Gateshead to the Durham Light Infantry 1/9th Battalion, service No: 2317.

Posted to Belgium he was killed in action on 1 March 1916 when his home residence was listed as Winlaton. He is named on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, panel 36 & 38.

Awarded the 14/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Locally, Daniel is remembered on the Winlaton Cross at St. Pauls’ Church, Winlaton.





 HAILES, Private Matthew  1886 – 1915

 

 

Matthew Hailes was a coal miner and the son of Margaret Norvil of 26 Hood Street, Swalwell. In 1911 he was living at 4 Corner Houses, Winlaton with his wife Mary and their three young children John, Robert and Jane.

He enlisted at Blaydon and attested to the Durham Light Infantry 1/9th Battalion service No: 2590. He was killed in action on 4 July 1915 age 29 years and buried at Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, Heuvelland,West Vlaanderen, Blegium grave ref: L.79.

 

Awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medals,

locally Matthew is remembered on the Winlaton Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton.



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HENDERSON , Private John Young  1883-1916



2nd Tyneside Scottish ‘Harder Than Hammers’ 102nd Brigade  21st  Service Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers.
Service No 21/433.Killed in Action 1St July 1916 – Battle of the Somme La Boisselle France

John was born at 34 Back George Street in Newcastle in 1883, son to John & Janet (Nee Young) Henderson. Siblings: Elizabeth (Lizzie),Henderson.Thomas William Henderson.Isabella Henderson.Janet Lindors Henderson.Kate (Kitty) Henderson. The 1901 census shows the Family living at 6 Robinson Street at Blaydon, where John was working at the Brick Works in Blaydon, Later family documents around 1920 show that the family were living at Manor House, North Street Winlaton and 3 Lichfield Street in Winlaton, the latter address is most likely the address at the time of enlistment as this was his parents’ home, we have been unable to establish if John was married or had children at the time he was killed.
 John is recorded as place of residence Winlaton when he was listed as missing in action on the 1st day of the battle of the Somme at La Boisselle near the Lochnagar mine crater France, John along with many comrades from Winlaton, Blaydon, Crawcrook, Ryton and Tyneside went over the top with the first wave of the 21st Battalion at 7.28 am zero Hour with after witnessing the Detonation of massive the Lochnagar & Y Sap Mines under the enemy lines. 
John along 72,336 other casualties from the battle of the Somme, are listed as having no know grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial in France Memorial Pier and Face 10B, 11B and 12B and is remembered on the Winlaton Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton. John was awarded the British War and Victory Medals
                

 

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HERRON , Private Thomas 1894 – 1915

 

Thomas Herron was the son of the late George and Mary Herron of 10 Cromwell place, Winlaton. He worked as a miner at Priestman’s Colliery, Blaydon Burn. He attested to the Durham Light Infantry 9th  Battalion service No: 1209. Records confirm he was 5’7” and weighed 10stones 10lb.

He spent 8 days in hospital 22/30 December 1914 with a septic foot. Posted to Belgium he died of wounds on 11 May 1915 age 21 years and is named on the Menin Gate Memorial, Panel36 & 38

The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates casualties from the forces of Australia, Canada, India, South Africa and United Kingdom who died in the Salient. The Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial now bears the names of more than 54,000 officers and men whose graves are not known.

 

Thomas was awarded the 14/15 Star, British War and Victory medals which were signed for by his mother Mary Herron of 12 Zion Place, Winlaton and locally remembered on the Winlaton War Memorial Cross

 

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HIGGINS , Lance Corporal Henry  1894 – 1919

 

Henry Higgins was a miner born at Mary Pit, Blaydon and at the time of the 1911 census lived with his parents Michael and Margaret Higgins and his brothers John and Roger Patrick at 22 Back Street, Winlaton. He joined the Durham Light Infantry service No. 9/2578 and was promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal. Awarded 14/15 Star, British War and Victory medals. He died after the war on 18 August 1919 aged 25. He is buried at St. Paul’s Cemetery, Winlaton – extension near entrance from West Lane ref: N.443. He is not named on the Winlaton War Memorial, cause of death not known.

 

 

Henry is not named on the Winlaton War Memorial, cause of death not known.

 

See also notes on Henry’s brother John Higgins – ref HIGGINS/WINLATON 053 

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HIGGINS , Private John  1889-1917

 

John Higgins was the son of Michael and Margaret Higgins from the Mary Pit, Blaydon Burn. The family were living at 22 Back Street, Winlaton in 1911. He had two brothers Henry and Roger Patrick. By 1913 he was married to Grace Ann Johnson with a baby son Roger Patrick and living at 8 Zion Terrace, Winlaton. He worked as a miner and joined the Durham Light Infantry service No. 13348 on 5 September 1914 but was discharged after 54 days on 28 October 1914 with the comment that his character was good but that he was not likely to become an efficient soldier. We also know that he was 5’ 9” tall with brown hair,blue eyes and a heart and dagger tattoo on his right forearm.

However, he re joined the army and was attested to the Durham Light Infantry 1/6th Battalion service No. 204181. Killed in action on 19 July 1917 he was buried at Wancourt British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France near Arras. Grave ref I.A.30.  

 

Awarded British War & Victory medals, LOCALLY

John is remembered on the War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton.

 

See also notes on John’s brother Henry Higgins who died in 1919 and is buried at Winlaton.

 

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HOWELL , Private Thomas 1885 - 1916

 

Thomas Howell was born at Charlestown, Staffordshire but came to the north east to work as a coal miner hewer. In 1911 he was living at 5 Quarry Houses, Blaydon with his wife Florence Hannah and their three young children Harriett, William Taylor and Alice. He attested to the Durham Light Infantry 13th Battalion service No: 13326. Posted to France he was killed in action on 11 October 1918 age 33 years and buried at Roisel Communal Cemetery extension grave ref: I.A.10 by which time his home address was 5 Widdrington Road, Blaydon.

 

Thomas was awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Locally he is remembered on the Winlaton Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton.

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HUDSON , Petty Officer Alma  1894-1916

 

 

Alma Hudson was the son of a quarryman Shadrack Hudson and Isabella Hudson. In 1911 he was working as a colliery labourer and the family lived at 28 North Street, Winlaton along with his six siblings. He enlisted in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve on 9 January 1915 service No: TZ/2886. Attached to the Port of Tyneside and HMS Drake Battalion Royal Naval Division. He  died as the result of enemy action on 13 November 1916 of wounds in 2/1st South Midland Casualty Clearing Station Special Hospital Warloy. His grave is at Warloy Baillon Communal Cemetery extension, Somme, France ref: 11.D.4

Alma Hudson was deployed to France with the Royal Naval Division Drake Battalion. The Battle of the Ancre 13–18 November,was the final large British attack of the Battle of the Somme in 1916, before the winter weather forced a pause in British attacks until the new year.

 

 

Awarded the Star, British War and Victory Medals, locally Alma is remembered on the War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church,Winlaton

 

 

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HUNTER , Private George 1886 – 1917

 

George Hunter was born on 16 January 1886 at Prudhoe. By 1911 he was working as a coal miner hewer at Emma Colliery and living at 47 Rectory Lane, Winlaton and later at 18 Back Street, Winlaton. He was married to Elizabeth Jane  and they had three young children Francis, Christopher and Gladys. He attested the Durham Light Infantry territorial Force at Blaydon on 14 September 1914  to 1/9th Battalion service No’s: 2591 & 32592. Posted to France he was engaged in the Battle of Arras 1917 and the 1st Battle of the Scarpe. He died of wounds on 25 April 1917 and is buried at Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty grave ref: IX.E.1 

 

Awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory medals George is remembered locally on the Winlaton Cross at St. Paul’s Church Winlaton and also on Ryton War Memorial, Ryton and Emma Colliery Memorial, Crawcrook.

 

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HUNTER , Able Seaman James Thomas 1895 – 1915

 

 

James and his sister Meggie

 

James Hunter was born on 17 March 1895 at Medomsley, Co. Durham one of six surviving children. His parents were John George, a coal miner and Phoebe ( Snowdon ) Hunter. In 1911 the family were living at Medomsley where James is recorded as a blacksmth’s apprentice. They later moved to 1 Store Street, Winlaton and then 19 Park Terrace, Winlaton.

James enlisted on 4 November 1914 and served with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Hawke Battalion R.N. Division, service No: Tyneside Z/915, giving his peacetime occupation as miner. From surviving records we know he was 5’8” tall with black hair and grey eyes.

 James was reported as wounded during the Battle of Dardanelles, then posted missing presumed killed in action on 20 June 1915 age 20 years. He is named on the Helles Memorial Panel 8 to 15. 

Awarded the Star, British War and Victory medals, locally James is remembered on the War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church Winlaton.He was also named on a silver plaque on the piano at the Primitive Methodist Chapel, Winlaton.

 

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IRWIN , Private George 1887 – 1918

 

George Irwin was born at Ryton. In 1911 he was working as a miner and living with his parents George and Sarah and his young wife Elizabeth and other family members at Dyke Heads, Greenside. George and Elizabeth later moved to 2 Caledonia Street, Winlaton. George attested to the Northumberland Fusiliers 23d Battalion, 4th Tyneside Scottish service No: 21/264. He enlisted at Newcastle and posted to France and saw action at the Battles of the Somme 1918 and St. Quentin 21-23 March 1918, where he was killed in action on 21 March 1918. His name is recorded on the Arras Memorial, Bay 2&3.  

George’s brother William Irwin also of the Northumberland Fusiliers ¼th Battalion Territorial Force Service No:1041 was killed in action on 15 September 1916 and is named on the Thiepval Memorial.

 

Awarded the British War and Victory Medals locally George is remembered on the Winlaton Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton and on Ryton War Memorial.

 

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JOBLING , Captain Ernest  1893 – 1918 

                        

Ernest Jobling was the son of Thomas and Mary A. Jobling of 69 Theresa Street, Blaydon. His father Thomas was an accountant for the Gas Co. while Ernest was a clerk with a shipping company. He had three other siblings. He married Winifred Isobel Davey from Sunderland during the 1st quarter of 1918 and their address is given as 36 Bexley Street, Sunderland.

He became a Captain in the 6th Battalion Army Cyclist Corps. Posted to France and was Mentioned in Dispatches this notice appeared in the London Gazette 22 June 1918:

“ For conspicuous gallantry & devotion to duty. During a discharge of gas projectors when 3 batteries of projectors were rendered useless owing to breakages in the connections, he himself, under a very heavy fire, repaired the damaged wires single handed and succeeded in firing the batteries.He has consistently shown a high example of courage and initiative to his men”.

“Mentioned in Despatches” is not an award of a medal, but  a commendation of an act of gallantry.

Ernest was killed in action on 23 October 1918 age 25 years and was buried at Romeries Communal Cemetery Extension, France Nord grave ref: IV.B.2.

Awarded the British War and Victory Medals he would also have been entitled to wear the  MID Oakleaf. Locally he is remembered on the Winlaton Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton, the Blaydon War Memorial and the plaque at

St. Cuthbert’s Church Blaydon. 

 

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JOHNSON, Private Charles 1877-1916

 

Charles was born at Winlaton 19 September 1877. In 1901 he is recorded as living with his parents Charles and Elizabeth ( Kelly) Johnson at 45 North Street, Winlaton along with 7 siblings and a sister in law. His parents record their occupations as hawkers on own account while Charles jnr. worked as a coal miner, stone work. His father was born at Warkworth and his mother at Rochester, Northumberland but Charles and his siblings were all born at Winlaton. In 1906 he married Mary Ann Chatburn who was born at West Hartlepool and by 1911 Charles and Mary Ann are living at 4 Messenger Bank, Shotley Bridge where Charles is working as a labourer to a mason, they have a young child Norah Victoria age 4 and two lodgers.  

Charles  served with the Northumberland Fusiliers 6th Battalion service No: 6/5068 and was killed in action on 23 March 1916 age 39 years. He is buried at Railway Dugouts Burial Ground(transport farm), Belgium, grave ref: I.B.19.

 

Awarded the British War and Victory medals, locally Charles is remembered on the Winlaton War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton, Blaydon War Memorial, the Plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Blaydon,  Shotley Bridge War Memorial Plaque at St. Cuthbert’s Church, Benfieldside and the war memorial cottages at Shotley Bridge.

 

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JOHNSON/BLAYDON 145

 

 

JOHNSTON , Private Wesley 1898 – 1918 

 

Wesley Johnston was the son of Richard and Mary Johnston of 18 Lime Street, Winlaton. Wesley’s father was a joiner working for the N.E. Railway he had one older brother Percy. In the 1911 census Wesley was still at school but after school he became a fitter. He attested to the Northumberland Fusiliers, service No: 1002 on 28 November 1914. However he was transferred back to Armstrong Whitworth on 22 January 1915 as being supernumery to his Company. He was recalled on 12 June 1918, posted to France he was transferred to the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment No 2 Section,16 Platoon, D Company service No. 35438.

We know from surviving service records that he was 5’ 4 1/2 “ tall with a 33” chest. He died of wounds received on 22 September 1918. Records confirm that on that day at 5.10pm he and a Pte. Cough were boiling water to make tea using strips of wood with a canteen suspended from the side of the trench by a bayonet. The witness ( Capt. Coulson) said he heard an explosion and rushing out from his shelter he found Pte. Clough lying at the bottom of the trench and Pte. Johnston was running towards the aid post, wounded. Capt. Coulson ran out to help and fetched a stretcher bearer. Going back to the trench he ascertained Pte. Clough was dead. Neither of the men were in possession of bombs and the nearest bomb was eight yards away. Testimony of Capt. Coulson & 3 others. Pieces of shrapnel found in the hole caused by the explosion was from a German cylindrical stick bomb buried in the trench. Wesley suffered multiple wounds to the left leg, left thigh, right knee, left arm and right arm and hand and severe haemorrhage. The death was recorded as accidental.

 

Wesley’s personal possessions returned to his family were: letters, a religious book, cigarette case, wrist watch with ribbon guard, purse and a penknife. Wesley was buried at Wancourt British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France grave ref: VIII.F.18

 

Awarded the British War and Victory Medals Wesley is remembered

locally on the Winlaton Cross at St. Pauls’ Church, Winlaton. 

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KELLY , Private James 1892 – 1917

 

 

James, one of eight surviving children was the son of James and Sarah Ann ( Burns) Kelly. He was born at Croxdale, Co. Durham but by 1911 was living with his family at 15 Mary Street, Blaydon Burn. He was working as a putter below ground while is father worked as a coal hewer. Later the family lived at 8 Alice Street, Winlaton. James attested at Blaydon and served with the Durham Light Infantry 13th Battalion, service No: 43712. posted to Belgium he died on 7 July 1917 and he is named on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing at Ypres, Addenda Panel 59. 

Awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, locally James is remembered on the War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton and the League of the Cross Roll of Honour at St. Joseph

’s RC Church, Blaydon.

 1. James was the eldest child, his siblings being born between 1893 and 1909. His youngest sister, Monica, died in 1912, leaving, 8 surviving children.
2. The family were living in Tudhoe on the 1901 census.
3. James enlisted at Blaydon on 23 September 1914 with the 9th Battalion DLI, service nr 2849. He was sent overseas, to Belgium, on 20 April 1915. Following a minor bullet wound in September 1916 he spent 4 months in England before being posted to the 13th Battalion on 19 January 1917, service no. 43712.
4. The 13th Battalion took over the trenches near Klein Zillebeke, just South of Ypres, on 6 July 1917, where they were under heavy attack from German raids. I presume this is how he was killed on 7 July. This was the same day that 2/Lt Frederick Youens of the 13th Battalion was awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous gallantry.

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LAMONBY , Private Joseph 1889 – 1916

 

                       

 

Joseph was born at Bedlington, Northumberland. In 1912 he married Mary C. Brooks and they lived at 3 Florence Street, Winlaton. Joseph enlisted at Blaydon and served with the Durham Light Infantry 1/9th Battalion, service No: 1847. He died of wounds on 21 April 1916 and is buried in the Cemetery extension at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton.

 

Awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory Medals he is remembered also on the War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church. 

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LAYBOURNE , Private George Edward Armstrong 1898-1918

 

George was the son of John and Eleanor (Ellen) Laybourne of 64 High Square, Winlaton Mill. Born at Winlaton Mill in 1911 he was still at school and living with his uncle James Massey and Aunt Margaret Armstrong at Winlaton Mill. George served with the Durham Light Infantry 1/5th Battalion, service No: 204303. Posted to Belgium he was killed in action no 12 April 1918 age 20 years and is named on the Ploegsteert Memorial , Panel 8 & 9.

 

Awarded the British War and Victory medals Locally George is remembered on the plaque at Winlaton Mill Village Hall and on the War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church,Winlaton. 

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LAYBOURNE , Private Joseph 1889 – 1918

                                          

Joseph Laybourne was born at Winlaton Mill, one of five children and the son of William and Eleanor ( Kendall) Laybourne. The family lived at 70 Winlaton Mill where Joseph worked as a bricklayer’s labourer and his father was a mill furnaceman.Joseph attested at Newcastle upon Tyne on 27 February 1917 to the Training Reserve Battalion service No’s :42565 & 52560. Based at home until 8 June 1917 he was posted to France and landed at Boulogne on 9 June 1917. He was transferred to the Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, service No: 28043 on 24 June 1917. From surviving records we know he was 5’7” tall with 35” chest.He was killed in action, posted missing presumed dead on 10 April 1918 age 29 years and he is named on the Loos Memorial, Panel 19 & 20. His sister Mary wrote to the war office on 8 August 1921 enquiring about his medals which had not been received and a reply on 13 August 1921 said they would be forwarded in due course. 

 

Awarded the British War and Victory Medals, Joseph is remembered locally on the War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton and on the Memorial Plaque at Winlaton Mill Village Hall. 

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LOWDON , Private Joseph  1891-1918 

 

Joseph Lowdon was born in Blaydon in 1911 he was living with parents John & Elizabeth Lowdon and four other siblings at 33 Robinson Street, Blaydon. He worked as a farm labourer. He joined the military and was assigned to the East Yorkshire Regiment service No: 56925 then Alexandra, Princess of Wales Own Yorkshire Regiment, 9th Battalion service No: 35924. He was killed in action in France on 27 October 1918 and buried at Cross Roads Cemetery, Fontaine au Bois, France ( Nord).  

Awarded the British War and Victory Medals Joseph is remembered locally at  Winlaton War Memorial Cross at St. Paul’s Church, Winlaton.

 

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